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Photo of the publication cover. Foodborne Illness Manual for Investigation Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

This purpose of this manual is to provide guidance for prompt detection of and response to foodborne illness outbreaks in New Mexico, recognizing that a successful foodborne illness outbreak investigation requires collaboration between partners from the disciplines of epidemiology, environmental health, food science and microbiology.



Photo of the publication cover. Hepatitis A Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Symptoms may include tiredness, poor appetite, fever and nausea. Urine may become darker in color. A person may develop jaundice which is a yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes. The symptoms may appear 2 to 6 weeks after exposure, but usually within four weeks.



Photo of the publication cover. Botulism Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Botulism is a neuroparalytic disorder characterized by an acute, afebrile, symmetric descending flaccid paralysis. Although rare, botulism is a serious illness caused by a nerve toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.



Photo of the publication cover. Campylobacteriosis Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Campylobacter infection causes acute gastroenteritis. Most infections are acquired by ingestion of undercooked chicken or pork or unpasteurized milk, from handling raw poultry, or from direct contact with fecal material of infected pets or farm animals.



Photo of the publication cover. Cryptosporidiosis Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Cryptosporidium species are protozoa that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. The protozoa have been found in a variety of hosts such as mammals, birds, and reptiles. Outbreaks have been associated with contamination of municipal water supplies and swimming pools, as well as petting zoos.



Photo of the publication cover. Escherichia coli Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are diarrhea-causing strains of a group of bacteria called Escherichia coli. E. coli O157:H7 is the most well-known type of STEC, but there are many other types that can cause illness in humans. While STEC infection has traditionally been associated with animal products, outbreaks associated with produce have become more common.



Photo of the publication cover. Giardiasis Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Giardiasis is a parasitic intestinal disease that may result in asymptomatic infection; acute, self-limited diarrhea; or chronic intermittent symptoms. The disease is spread primarily from person to person through ingestion of infective cysts.



Photo of the publication cover. Listeriosis Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Listeriosis is caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Infection results from ingestion of contaminated foods or from maternal transmission to the neonate. In high-risk individuals, listeriosis causes meningoencephalitis and/or septicemia.



Photo of the publication cover. Salmonellosis Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Salmonella infection most commonly causes acute gastroenteritis. Most infections are acquired by ingestion of contaminated food or water (particularly raw eggs or milk), or by cross contamination during food handling (particularly raw poultry). Laboratory diagnosis is made by stool culture.



Photo of the publication cover. Shigellosis Fact Sheet Foodborne Disease Agents - Help March 1, 2016

Shigellosis most commonly causes acute gastroenteritis. Illness is often characterized by diarrhea, fever, nausea, and sometimes vomiting and cramps; mild infections can occur. Stools often contain blood and mucus. Most infections are acquired by fecal-oral transmission from an infected person, or from fecal contamination of water or food.